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Thread: What does it take to be a Raid Leader!

  1. #1
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    What does it take to be a Raid Leader!

    Raid Leading
    What does it take, how can I do it?


    OUTLINE
    1. What does a raid leader do?
    2. How should a raid leader prepare himself
    3. How to judge the limitations of your guild.
    4. How to judge what you need for an individual encounter.
    5. How to conduct yourself to the guild.
    6. How to handle confrontations.
    7. How to fix "problem players" in a raid.
    8. How to improve your guild's relations with other guilds and the server




    What does it take?


    A raid leader is the single most important player in many guilds. The raid leader must spend much of his available time studying encounters. This player is confident in his playmanship, vocal, understands general concepts of other classes, is not afraid to confront other players, or call them out in raids, and most importantly, this player can react in snap decisions on what to do.


    This player does not mind wiping or helping players in his or her guild. The raid leader is always responsible for his actions, and other players reactions. For it is his job to prepare them for the choices they must make.


    IMPORTANT: You should never be cocky! You do not know it all, do not act like you do. Raid leading is an important job, not a throne. There is nothing worse than a rude raid leader, who is lackluster in performance.


    Well, if this sounds like something you are completely prepared for, with no doubts at all, then I congratulate you on your outstanding character.




    How to prepare yourself and your raid



    In order to succeed as a raid leader you have to study an encounter inside and out.


    These are some ways to do that.


    1. PTR- most of you reading this will probably never go to a PTR (public test realm).This is very easy to do though, and allows you to have first hand experience with each encounter before they come out. The PTR is the first line of knowledge that most well balanced raid leaders react too.


    2. Video's - Another way to educate yourself and your raid, very easy to do. Many different approaches are available on videos, so one strategy is not always best for your guild. www.youtube.com www.tankspot.com , ect...


    3. Websites - Many websites are dedicated to wow. Many have written strategies that involve searching. These often contain exceptional tips on encounters and should almost always be considered. These websites also contain multiple class guides. If your guild has forums, then you should almost always be posting these websites into their respective area's.


    Some examples include,
    www.tankspot.com - Any tanking class
    www.elitestjerks.com -dps
    www.maxdps.com -dps
    www.plusheal.com - healing



    4. Other guilds / players - learning from the top guild on your server, or asking one of your friends in that guild how they do an encounter is another way to learn different ways.



    How do you judge your guild


    Lets be very frank in this section. All guilds have limitations. Whether it is a lack of a certain classes, motivation, skill, gear, or attitude there is a way to push your guild in whatever direction you feel is needed in order to succeed.


    You should be honest in your assessment. you should not be afraid of letting those who run the guild know what your guilds limitations are. It is your job to fix these raids. Do it. If there is a certain player who does not cut it, let them know. If there is a lack of a certain class, then take the necessary steps to fill that gap.


    Everyone who is a raid leader should be aware of how your guild reacts to complex ideas. If your guild cannot handle them, then it is up to you to find a solution for them. This solution can come before or during the raid. My current guild likes to use the "Brute Force" method. This method means that we attack the boss, and just try to stand out of fire, ect...


    Adapting for raids is key to success. Whether it is a strat for the 4 Horsemen, Sarth with Drakes, KT, or Yogg, you should always know the limits of your players and how to make those limits succeed.



    What do I need for this raid

    1. You should know first and formost your assessment on how hard this raid will be.


    2. Should I allow decent players, or only exceptional players into this raid.
    (How will my fellow guildies react?) - Always be able to answer this question.


    3. Do I need all of the necessary buffs. (Fort, GOTW, might/battle, Kings, commanding, DK str., arms/drood crit.) All of these factors have to be taken into consideration.
    (MMO-Champion RaidComp)


    4. Do i need a Mind control, do a need a drood to kite, do I need this many heals/tanks?


    5. Have a backup plan!


    Reviewing Performance
    Why did you wipe? Check combat logs, recount, anything that could suggest why you died. If it's not obvious at first, look harder. There's almost always a fairly obvious reason that may not be readily apparent. Just blaming the healers as a whole creates animosity if it's just one healer who slipped up one time. Focus more on fixing the problem than assigning blame!


    Quelling Displeasure
    Nothing kills morale like failure. Do your best to improve morale before it hits a low. If it was a good attempt, say so. If it was a poor attempt with an easy fix, say so. Don't say things like "What the fuck are you guys doing? You're all so bad!" unless you want the raid to fall apart.


    Changing Assignments
    Not everyone is good at every facet of their class. If a ranged fails to position orbs properly on anub, assign a different ranged to shoot them down. If your tank healer is unable to keep up with incoming spike damage, get a different tank healer. Don't think someone's bad because they're not dispelling enough. Stick them where they're strong and get a different dispeller.


    Altering raid composition
    Sometimes, you only need two tanks. Sometimes you need more healers. Dual specs help guarantee you can switch members' roles if needed. Be liberal with this, and understand fights. If you are constantly wiping because of a few individuals, replace them. Don't be bashful. You're leading a raid and they are underperforming--plain and simple.

    (Almightypancake)

    If a tank dies, then a certain OT will need to take over. If a healer dies then have another switch over. Be sure to allow communications between vital members of the raid. On multiple occasions I have put people on shut off duty in another channel so they can continue to say their commands without being interrupted.



    How should I conduct myself


    1. It is very important to show confidence in your ideas.


    2. Always have a plan, and allow for those in your guild to come and talk about strats.


    3. You should command raiders in your guild during your raid. You should have fun with them outside of the raids.


    4. When you are in a raid make it known that you are in control and shenanigans will not be tolerated.


    5. Be sure to play with all of your players, not just those who are very good. This not only brings up spirits but also allows for an assessment of how good they are.


    Treat People like they are People: It's often very easy as a raid leader to get caught up in the numbers involved with working to complete an encounter. We are going to need this much DPS, this many healers doing X amount of healing ect. It's often that we forget that these "numbers" are actually people that have life outside of wow. They have jobs, family and friends ect that may prevent them from doing all the research into their class that others do themselves. Understand your trying to convince people to follow you into these often complicated encounters that may take a good amount of their time to complete that they could otherwise spend elsewhere. I often wonder how it is that I can convince all my raiders to 6 nights a week listen to my advice, follow my directions and spend their free time based on my ability to lead them alone.

    Most of this is from treating everyone equally. We all do our part, no one ever is seen as not contributing to the success of the group so long as they were online and played to the best of their ability. I always address mishaps or wipes as the need for improvement by the team, ALL OF US including myself. I have never seen a raid with 9/24 absolutely perfect players who never need to improve and one really poor one. Treat your raiders like they are all equals no better or worse then the raider standing/lying next to them and you will build a stronger relationship within your raid.

    (taken from maangart1st)

    How to handle confrontations

    1. You should always take into consideration the feelings of those you are talking too.


    2. Always start with a whisper, then, if needed, be vocal and call them out.


    3. Tell the guild master about your problems. It is not your job to discipline players.



    How to fix "problem players"
    If someone is not too good, then for goodness sakes, help them. You were like that once. I will agree that there are some players who are unable to learn and some who are not willing. My advice, Kick em. As for those willing to learn, then it is your job to help them.


    There will be times in your guild where everything is going wrong, you stall, people leave, people dont wish to attend raids anymore. The best thing you can do is listen.


    You should be willing to eithier talk to, or demote any and all leaders in the guild who are lackluster in performance. What does it show when your attempting to fix a player and the person you send him or her to is just as lackluster.
    Believe me, everyone notices.


    If the problem is not with the leadership or you refuse to demote the leadership you will have to be willing to regrow your raid roster. Chances are, you will not be any more successful due to bringing the lackluster officers anyway. Find the players with potential and invite them to your guild. Help them become better, slow down on raids, cut back on what you do.

    Exp. Make two ten mans into one. Change 2 night 25 mans into 1 ect...

    Ways to help


    1. Websites
    2. Class leaders
    3. Friends who play that class
    4. Patience
    5. Be an example!

    Edit: How to fix a group issue

    There are often times where a person is put into the posistion of raid leader without any idea on what he or she should work on achieving. These are some things you, as a raid leader, should focus on.

    1. Attitudes - With the right mindset any adversion can be overcome. Having everyone in your raid willing to wipe, without griping is something that I feel every guild should focus on. Having one person say "This cannot be done" effectivly ruins the excitement of downing new content. This is a key factor.

    2. Type of guild - Make it know what type of guild your guild actually is. (hardcore, semi-hardcore, casual, ect..). Stressing what type of guild yours is when you recruit lets those new incoming members know what to expect from your guild. You as the raid leader have the power to change how your guild is percieved by how well you do. My current guild is a semi-hardcore guild, yet we strive to be our best with what we have.

    3. Family atmosphere - Having everyone in your raid being comfortable while raiding with others is something which shows a strong sence of pride. It shows the idea of, "together we will succeed".


    NOTES: There is no one way to fix no shows. Motivation, work ethic, ect...

    There is nothing a raid leader can do, other than increase raid performance, and increase recruiting in order to achieve success.


    It is up to you to make your own decisions because every decision is always different.


    NOTE: Dealing with the day to day issues of failures in raids, no shows, problem players, canceled runs, can all be stressful. Being calm and respectful are the way to handle things.




    There are two types of griping.


    1. Officers - This is the hardest to handle. When your leadership expresses concerns about the recent or long term failures of raid or raiding, it is because you have not dealt with the issues involving these failures.


    FIX

    The first thing you should do is express the problem, and ask for advice. (from your leadership).


    Second, go about the solution in which you belive will solve the problem.


    If you have infact tried to solve these failures, and the leadership refuses to help, or decides they do not enjoy your presence, then my advice is to leave. There is nothing you can do other than your best to achieve success.


    2. Members - Having members gripe about you is something no raid leader should tolerate. If your raids are going on time, successful, and fun, then there is no reason in which you should have anyone cause dissention amoung the ranks. Do not let anyone get the best of you.


    FIX - You should let your guild master know, and have him announce at the begining of each raid that these actions will not be tolerated. Have him say what type of guild you are in, and that is what you try to be. Most griping comes down to the fact of progression. Letting your members know what type of guild they joined is key to not causeing this type of drama. If they leave over this issue, then it is their fault for joining in the first place.


    There are times when you should know your limits. You, as good as you think you are, might just be bad. (No disrespect)



    HERE IT IS AGAIN


    IMPORTANT: You should never be cocky! You do not know it all, do not act like you do. Raid leading is an important job, not a throne. There is nothing worse than a rude raid leader, who is lackluster in performance.




    Guild relations

    It is often up to the raid leader to recruit players. Having a good reputation helps. Be sure to be nice to everyone you meet. You might be better, but they might become just as good as you one day.


    If your guild is not the best, then do the raids they are able to do. Once your guild's raid is finished then do one that is above your guilds skill level. Try to bring in as many of your top players as you can. this helps a core group become ready for these raids in the future.


    Note: I personally did this for Naxx 25, Maly 10 and 25, We succeeded in doing these as a full guild run because we had slowly progressed enough players through pugs in order to achieve success.


    How to Deal with stress

    1. Build a team around you who you trust and who can some of the strain. No one is that angelic, patient and all-knowing to RL 100% by themselves - while during a raid you often need to be the one driving force and voice, it's awesome to have someone to take some of the strain or to nudge you quietly in a whisper if they sense you're getting stressed out. I'd probably even add to this that often it's a good idea to have a separate RL to GM and to recruitment person and to person who looks after the website - all with the aim of avoiding burnout.

    2. Communicate ... communicate ... communicate - open lines of communication across all "levels" within guild are essential. I know in the middle of raids the numbers of whispers and channels a RL is tracking is enormous, but both inside and outside of raids it's vital to keep communication flowing in all directions - so often things get blown out of proportion because someone takes for granted that someone else has noticed the thing that's driving them mad and instead of saying something about it early they leave it, while you don't want guildies questioning your every decision (especially during raids) - good questions and concerns are healthy.
    (Taken from Mr. Shortypop)

    If you read a strategy to your raid word-for-word, it's going to not really sink in, in my experience. "Tanks take spike damage, I need you and you to stay on tank x so he doesn't die." is really so much better than saying "Now the boss will do Super Attack, this attack does 30,000 to 35,000 to a tank..."

    Your common raider doesn't need to know the names of certain attacks, or their numerical value. They just need to know their job, and how to survive when something happens to them. Going in detail merely distracts them.

    As an example, we were able to do Hard Mode Iron Council 25 man by merely explaining. "Kill the first 2 guys as normal. Phase 3, big guy. If you get the debuff, run into melee so you don't get another, or you'll die. When the debuff is off, get out of meele. You 3 healers stay in meele so you don't get the debuff, and heal those with the debuff."

    That is literarly all I said on our first attempts, and we had 0 raid deaths (though a few tank mishaps)- and we're not anything special, we stand in fire like everyone else :P I have noticed a vast improvement in raid performance by giving the bare bones.
    (Liongale)


    EXAMPLE

    In my current guild we have the raid leader who is a tank (Usually we have a fun roll off to see who tanks what)
    Tanking situation = Done

    A healer who is an officer, he decides what pally buffs to use for each pally, and who will heal what.
    (The raid leader can change who is healing who based on what he feels will be more productive.)
    Healing = Done

    Usually we have someone else lead the shutoffs in another channel, or Mc's ect...
    Special Stuff = done

    As for Dps splits ect... We have a dps meter posted in O, and the raid leader tells people where to go.
    DPS = Done

    Having a group of hardworking officers is key to success. As Shorty mentioned, the effort should be spread out as not have a burned out raid leader. Communication is also key so people do not cause drama.

    If you start to become burnt out, then please regard the following suggestion!

    Have more than one RL, and rotate them every now and then. Your guild, situation and members will dictate how you will manage this. Raid Leading is not for the faint hearted, but all too often they burn out.
    (Acheronia)

    If anyone has anything to add, please feel free to post.

    About me:
    I have been on both sides of the tract. I have been a raid leader in an amazing guild that is decent in performance. I have also been in a top world guild, and have been the raid leader's fodder. I understand how it feels to be bossed around, and to boss people around.

    Last edited by Manginae; 04-21-2010 at 01:05 PM. Reason: Addition

  2. #2
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    Is "willing to get grey hair at the age of 21" part of it? No one told me about that part D=

    Good post though!
    [Today 09:38 AM] Reev: The older I get, the more I think those Greek philosophers were just annoying hipsters.
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  3. #3
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    Great post indeed. The only thing I might suggest is if you have any advice on delivering not-so-good news to the guildies in general it'd be appreciated. Taking time to work with people on an individual basis is fine, but what do you do when entire groups need work?

    Sure the Guild Leader and other Officers know, but for all of us it's a bear. and not the Druid kind either. Some individuals are naturally gonna be able to clear higher content than what the guild is ready for via pugs and their own personal progression, and all of a sudden because people see these more geared/skilled/lucky/connected people, they THINK they're ready for that same level of content but they're not. How do you explain that to a guild in general so they understand, but don't have feelings hurt? whispers are fine, but that kinda takes awhile to do one by one, and the more people you tell the more the rumor-mill starts to work, and all of a sudden you're teh ebil because you've 'got a bad attitude and think everyone in the guild sucks' or some-such other exaggeration founded thanks to the telephone game.
    "I don't have a dream, so I protect the dreams of others."~Inui Takumi

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tylovan View Post
    Great post indeed. The only thing I might suggest is if you have any advice on delivering not-so-good news to the guildies in general it'd be appreciated. Taking time to work with people on an individual basis is fine, but what do you do when entire groups need work?

    Sure the Guild Leader and other Officers know, but for all of us it's a bear. and not the Druid kind either. Some individuals are naturally gonna be able to clear higher content than what the guild is ready for via pugs and their own personal progression, and all of a sudden because people see these more geared/skilled/lucky/connected people, they THINK they're ready for that same level of content but they're not. How do you explain that to a guild in general so they understand, but don't have feelings hurt? whispers are fine, but that kinda takes awhile to do one by one, and the more people you tell the more the rumor-mill starts to work, and all of a sudden you're teh ebil because you've 'got a bad attitude and think everyone in the guild sucks' or some-such other exaggeration founded thanks to the telephone game.

    Fix'd

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    thanks alot! and again, great post!
    "I don't have a dream, so I protect the dreams of others."~Inui Takumi

  6. #6
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    Good read, two things I would add:

    1. Build a team around you who you trust and who can some of the strain. No one is that angelic, patient and all-knowing to RL 100% by themselves - while during a raid you often need to be the one driving force and voice, it's awesome to have someone to take some of the strain or to nudge you quietly in a whisper if they sense you're getting stressed out. I'd probably even add to this that often it's a good idea to have a separate RL to GM and to recruitment person and to person who looks after the website - all with the aim of avoiding burnout.

    2. Communicate ... communicate ... communicate - open lines of communication across all "levels" within guild are essential. I know in the middle of raids the numbers of whispers and channels a RL is tracking is enormous, but both inside and outside of raids it's vital to keep communication flowing in all directions - so often things get blown out of proportion because someone takes for granted that someone else has noticed the thing that's driving them mad and instead of saying something about it early they leave it, while you don't want guildies questioning your every decision (especially during raids) - good questions and concerns are healthy.
    **Give me a hug and I'll defend you with my life**
    Blog: http://www.tankspot.com/blog.php?550-Shortypop

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shortypop View Post
    Good read, two things I would add:

    1. Build a team around you who you trust and who can some of the strain. No one is that angelic, patient and all-knowing to RL 100% by themselves - while during a raid you often need to be the one driving force and voice, it's awesome to have someone to take some of the strain or to nudge you quietly in a whisper if they sense you're getting stressed out. I'd probably even add to this that often it's a good idea to have a separate RL to GM and to recruitment person and to person who looks after the website - all with the aim of avoiding burnout.

    2. Communicate ... communicate ... communicate - open lines of communication across all "levels" within guild are essential. I know in the middle of raids the numbers of whispers and channels a RL is tracking is enormous, but both inside and outside of raids it's vital to keep communication flowing in all directions - so often things get blown out of proportion because someone takes for granted that someone else has noticed the thing that's driving them mad and instead of saying something about it early they leave it, while you don't want guildies questioning your every decision (especially during raids) - good questions and concerns are healthy.

    Fix'd and sourced

  8. #8
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    A few things:

    MMO-Champion RaidComp is a great source for checking to ensure you cover as many raid buffs as possible.

    There is a lot of text markup in the guide that appears to be a link but it isn't. It is slightly frustrating. You should probably aim to have just a couple header styles and then bold for emphasis to not confuse the reader into clicking non-existant links.

    As I also was a raid leader for your current guild it might be nice to have a section on adjusting strategies to fit the guild in your research section as well. Some raids can execute complicated but efficient strats and other guilds are unable to execute complicated strats. Ci was most effective when it generally ignored Tankspot movie guides and came up with a simpler strat. RL's need to learn to be flexible in their approach to boss encounters. Before encounter guides were written guilds had extremely varied strategies for bosses that were generally as effective as each other. The biggest example that comes to mind was Lore's original Auriaya 10 man video on this site. He encouraged killing the feral defender as it came out and kiting her over the raid. Most raids had figured out that the damage from the FD in 10 man wasn't significant enough to bother with it rather quickly and never had to deal with a poorly placed void zone.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by geros View Post

    MMO-Champion RaidComp is a great source for checking to ensure you cover as many raid buffs as possible.

    There is a lot of text markup in the guide that appears to be a link but it isn't. It is slightly frustrating. You should probably aim to have just a couple header styles and then bold for emphasis to not confuse the reader into clicking non-existant links.

    As I also was a raid leader for your current guild it might be nice to have a section on adjusting strategies to fit the guild in your research section as well. Some raids can execute complicated but efficient strats and other guilds are unable to execute complicated strats. Ci was most effective when it generally ignored Tankspot movie guides and came up with a simpler strat. RL's need to learn to be flexible in their approach to boss encounters. Before encounter guides were written guilds had extremely varied strategies for bosses that were generally as effective as each other. The biggest example that comes to mind was Lore's original Auriaya 10 man video on this site. He encouraged killing the feral defender as it came out and kiting her over the raid. Most raids had figured out that the damage from the FD in 10 man wasn't significant enough to bother with it rather quickly and never had to deal with a poorly placed void zone.
    Added MMO, tryed to fix colors, added in a small section on adaption to strats under judging. Thanks

  10. #10
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    I would add that a raid leader should be aware of any baggage they might be bringing to the raid. Attitudes of people often reflect the attitudes of their leaders, and if a raid leader shows up pissy about something that happened at work, other people in the raid are liable to become pissy as well, often without even realizing why.

    If you are in a bad mood when a raid is about to start, or know you're not up to the standard you'd want in someone leading you, let an officer know beforehand and that maybe it's better if someone pick up for you that night. You can still help lead in the background, but try not to express yourself on Ventrilo, unless you're sure you can put on a good face.

  11. #11
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    A lot of good things said here, but I want to add that your voice on Vent, or 'tone' of text chat is important. Also brevity in explanations of fight is a must- though a talent that must be learned through experience.

    If you read a strategy to your raid word-for-word, it's going to not really sink in, in my experience. "Tanks take spike damage, I need you and you to stay on tank x so he doesn't die." is really so much better than saying "Now the boss will do Super Attack, this attack does 30,000 to 35,000 to a tank..."

    Your common raider doesn't need to know the names of certain attacks, or their numerical value. They just need to know their job, and how to survive when something happens to them. Going in detail merely distracts them.

    As an example, we were able to do Hard Mode Iron Council 25 man by merely explaining. "Kill the first 2 guys as normal. Phase 3, big guy. If you get the debuff, run into melee so you don't get another, or you'll die. When the debuff is off, get out of meele. You 3 healers stay in meele so you don't get the debuff, and heal those with the debuff."

    That is literarly all I said on our first attempts, and we had 0 raid deaths (though a few tank mishaps)- and we're not anything special, we stand in fire like everyone else :P I have noticed a vast improvement in raid performance by giving the bare bones.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Liongale View Post
    A lot of good things said here, but I want to add that your voice on Vent, or 'tone' of text chat is important. Also brevity in explanations of fight is a must- though a talent that must be learned through experience.

    If you read a strategy to your raid word-for-word, it's going to not really sink in, in my experience. "Tanks take spike damage, I need you and you to stay on tank x so he doesn't die." is really so much better than saying "Now the boss will do Super Attack, this attack does 30,000 to 35,000 to a tank..."

    Your common raider doesn't need to know the names of certain attacks, or their numerical value. They just need to know their job, and how to survive when something happens to them. Going in detail merely distracts them.

    As an example, we were able to do Hard Mode Iron Council 25 man by merely explaining. "Kill the first 2 guys as normal. Phase 3, big guy. If you get the debuff, run into melee so you don't get another, or you'll die. When the debuff is off, get out of meele. You 3 healers stay in meele so you don't get the debuff, and heal those with the debuff."

    That is literarly all I said on our first attempts, and we had 0 raid deaths (though a few tank mishaps)- and we're not anything special, we stand in fire like everyone else :P I have noticed a vast improvement in raid performance by giving the bare bones.
    Fix'd

  13. #13
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    Bump for those would like to add, or correct, due to ICC being all the way out.

    Currently working on a solution for guilds with two 25 man progression nights, and lack of raiders attending the second night due to wipes, or no fun.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Manginae View Post
    Bump for those would like to add, or correct, due to ICC being all the way out.

    Currently working on a solution for guilds with two 25 man progression nights, and lack of raiders attending the second night due to wipes, or no fun.
    Having recently built up a guild to a reasonable progression level in ICC (7/12, haven't stepped foot in the new wing and had a .8% wipe on putricide last night) from nothing, I think I have a few suggestions here.

    Essentially, when I bring in new raiders, there are three primary qualities I look at during their trial period: flexibility, desire, and goals.

    Flexibility refers to a raider's ability to improvise, adapt, and improve. If you have too many raiders who are set in their ways--a tank who doesn't gear for high armor values on hard hitting melee fights, an ele shaman who doesn't want to spec into improved earthbind for saurfang, or perhaps a warlock who refuses to tank princes--you'll run into the problem of stagnant progression. While not all raiders should spec and re-spec at your whim, you need to be able to rely on a majority of your raid members to be willing to change their gearset, skillset, and mindset in order to progress.

    Don't be afraid to shake things up a bit as well. It's dangerous to have a raid rely on a few people to lead meters. I had a lot of officers on edge when I asked our top raid healer to go dps for festergut (since we normally run 6). To hear them tell it, missing that single healer rather than having one of our lesser healers go dps would have stopped us from downing festergut. After a couple hours of steady work (for everyone involved), we eventually downed it. As a result, every raider has faith in our entire healing core, and our healing core trusts me to a greater extent. You need to be able to rely on all of your raiders to step it up no matter what role they're filling.

    Desire refers to a raider's drive to improve as well as their drive to see the raid progress. Don't just listen to what they say, watch how they perform. Are they up-to-date on their latest strategies? Do they flask/pre-pot/anything they can possibly do to improve the status of the raid? You don't want a raider who's just interested in joining you because you're further progressed than their current guild. Be wary of applicants who say "yeah my current guild can't kill saurfang because etc. etc. etc." Often times (though not always!) these are raiders who are prone to jump ship with little warning, and will happily use your guild to get experience killing bosses, then jump to another guild more progressed than yours. These raiders are leeches, and they'll eventually hit a brick wall.

    To avoid these raiders, personally speak with every new recruit. Vent works best for this. Learn why they're interested in your guild. If their last guild was stuck on a certain boss, see if you can discern why. Keep in mind through the entire process that any raider with enough desire/drive to perform well is an asset to your raid. We recently brought in a rogue as a backup position. He was geared in primarily heroic/emblem gear. It's been three weeks, and he is now our top dps, pulling well over 9k or more on single target fights.

    Goals are the priorities of your raiders. This is easily the most important aspect of a raider's personality. What is it that gives your raider the desire to perform? Are they competitive in the sense that they enjoy being top dps on every fight? Be cautious, because sometimes these raiders lose interest when they are consistently bested on the meters, and will tend towards bitterness. Similarly, if they are top dps on every fight, they are more likely to lose their patience when a fight becomes a roadblock. If you suspect some of your raiders are obsessed with meters, start gradually diverting them to jobs that lower their dps (assuming, of course, that you're able to complete an encounter effectively without them). Have your ret paladin run around hitting adds on deathwhisper, or have your top hunter on kinetic orbs during princes. Not only does this improve your raid's confidence in themselves, it also improves the confidence of your top players in your raid as a whole. Some players can get to where they feel they're carrying the whole raid on their backs, and this sort of attitude can easily lead to drama.

    The goals of your raiders should align with your own as a raid leader. Are you hoping to kill hardmode arthas, or simply have fun three or four days a week? Make sure that you have raiders with the same goals. Perhaps you just want a bunch of raiders decked out in 264 gear so you can stand around in dalaran while people go "oooh" and "ahhh" over your gearscore. You can find players who share that goal as well.

    The overall message here is that you need a group of raiders who have the same goals as you, the desire to make it happen, and the flexibility to fulfill that desire. You can't force someone to change their goals. If someone doesn't show up on progression nights, find someone who will. It might mean losing your top dps, but you'll also possibly be losing your top ego as well .

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    Williamsburg, VA
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    On another note, I wrote a guide to raidleading: http://www.tankspot.com/showthread.p...and-PUGs-alike

    It deals with some different issues than yours, so you're more than welcome to take a few paragraphs out of it or link to it if you see anything in there you like.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Atlanta, you know where the players play
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    Quote Originally Posted by almightypancake View Post
    On another note, I wrote a guide to raidleading: http://www.tankspot.com/showthread.p...and-PUGs-alike

    It deals with some different issues than yours, so you're more than welcome to take a few paragraphs out of it or link to it if you see anything in there you like.
    Thanks, added some new content and sourced

  17. #17
    A small thing I'd like to add for Guild Leaders regarding their Raid Leader(s). Have more than one and rotate them every now and then. Your guild and your situation and your guild members will dictate how you will manage this. Raid Leading is not for the faint hearted, but all too often they burn out. Good Raid Leaders are hard to come by, so look after them carefully!
    http://divinedge.wowstead.com
    We are currently recruiting..

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    56
    very good post. I recently took on the role of raidleader as I've been playing wow since Vanilla and most o fmy guild are WoTLK guys I figured deeper experience would come in handy. I had to really push the fact they won't catch me explaining every single detail of every fight prior to every encounter and some of them really hate that I won't. I explain the basic mechanics 'you do this, unless this happens then you do this' and refuse to accept that anyone hasn't watched videos pre raid for the theory alone.

    I'll point them here next time the minority moan

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Atlanta, you know where the players play
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    Quote Originally Posted by Acheronia View Post
    A small thing I'd like to add for Guild Leaders regarding their Raid Leader(s). Have more than one and rotate them every now and then. Your guild and your situation and your guild members will dictate how you will manage this. Raid Leading is not for the faint hearted, but all too often they burn out. Good Raid Leaders are hard to come by, so look after them carefully!
    Added in, Thanks!

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    2
    Thanks for this guide, mate. This made me think a lot about trying to become a raid leader and I will do my best to succeed.

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