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View Full Version : And another fun guild goes...



Davor7
05-27-2009, 11:42 PM
Has anyone else been in this? Of course some have. But I just wanted to ask what is the longest a good guild has stayed together, had fun in the game, no drama? Have any of you tried to keep in touch with those people you have a great time with that has been scattered like the wind?

I am scared to join another guild because they don't seem to stay together for any longer than a few months. What makes that so hard is all the people you had fun with go to other guilds. And now its like you are alone in the game again.

Durandro
05-28-2009, 03:27 AM
Drama is always going to happen withing a group of people. The trick is to move past it and don't let a minor thing blow out of proportion.

Easier said then done. But social guilds can last just as long as raiding guilds (or longer).

Biggensak
05-28-2009, 07:26 AM
I dunno, my former guild split not long ago (good opportunity for our harder core raiders) and instead of bemoaning the inability to find another guild I simply started my own and opened an invitation to anyone from the old group that I enjoyed playing with that wanted to join up. I set up a single weekly 10-man Uldar raid and started with a grand total of 2 guildies in the first raid..

Fourth week in and our roster is filling up nicely with folks I've met while running our scheduled Thursday night events and have doubled the length of my /friends list with folks who are interested in participating in our raids outside of the guild. I'm at the point where turning people away may become a bigger issue than having enough to show up and have some fun.... I'm not a particularly experienced raider or particularly great raid leader but by taking care of organizing the right people and being consistent it was easy to get right back in to the swing. Keep in mind people looking to PuG are often without a frequent raiding guild or are alts of folks with raid experience looking for a less intense raid experience... They are probably logged on at an ideal time/day to raid on a regular basis so the chance of finding a folks to raid at the same time more than once is high. PuG raids are about the best casual guild recruiting tool out there since it's just not practical to exercise guild application d-baggery in a casual guild.

I guess the moral of the story is.. you can either sit back and complain that nobody else wants to manage a casual guild for you that might break up.. or you can invest some time in creating and managing your own casual guild. It's not hard, it just takes some patience and a level of self confidence to get through that first couple of weeks. Put together some recurring raid nights and PuG every other spot if you have to, in time if you'll start to pick up regulars that will either join your guild or at least attend raids regularly. Problem solved.

sicness
05-28-2009, 08:11 AM
I can tell you from experience that a semi-casual guild that raids consistently is one of the hardest things to run in the game. You get people who take it too casually and then you get people who take it too seriously and rarely get the people right in the middle that are perfectly happy where they are. The more casual people usually end up quitting the game or at least stop raiding and the more serious people usually end up moving up to a higher end guild that can offer more for them leaving you typically recruiting constantly. The roughest times are the 'break' times as well. Where people get out of school and go on vacation/RL stuff and you get even fewer people on and have a chance to not raid for a few days or even a week or two. That's the point most of the serious people move up to a higher end guild that's more reliable to them in creating a raid.

Drama always is what kills guilds, I've seen 1 person break up a guild and I've seen 5-6 people break up a guild, no matter what it happens because there will always be people in game who don't get along and you can't do anything about. The best thing to do is just take it one step at a time and realize that's what happens in this game.

Fayre
05-28-2009, 10:14 AM
Our guild has been together for just over four years, some of them right from the start. It is possible, though you still get the odd drama now and again - if the core friendships are strong, the guild won't vanish overnight.

Biggensak
05-28-2009, 10:42 AM
Interesting observations, I guess I haven't seen the same play out in my own "casual raiding guild" leadership position... but I am also very clear with people what I looking for when they join when it comes to their participation in the guild and our 10-man progression crew. I tell folks to treat it like joining a softball/volleyball or similar sports league, schedule your "game night" in advance like you would any other league commitment and there should be no reason regular attendance can't be expected. Inviting one or two new PuG members each week to help deepen the /friend list (and guild roster sometimes) also helps a ton.

It's also important in this sort of guild to realize you will become a farm team for larger guilds to recruit from - which isn't always a bad thing. Having a good reputation with a larger hardcore guild for producing talent to fill in their own roster can open doors for both guilds. You may be able to borrow some highly skilled off-night subs with experience and perspectives from the larger guild that wouldn't otherwise be available to help your casual guild learn. You may also benefit from having some experienced raiders wanting a break/less intense schedule cascade to your guild without having to permanently cut ties with the bigger raiding guild. In turn the smaller guild may provide great subs on off-nights to the larger entity if they have a shallow sub bench while also providing an option to evaluate possible future talent. I've even had one "hardcore" guilds refer folks that had applied to their guilds but had a scheduling conflict or were short on experience but not talent.

I guess it's all about perspective... if you are trying to lock people into a permanent life commitment as a guild leader in a casual/serious guild you will be disappointed... if you become locked into only running with the same 9 people every week at the exclusion of all others you will also fail in this format.. the key is to provide a consistent experience with enough flexibility to allow a healthy flow of talent in and out of your guild and raid group(s). Know when to cut the drama kings/queens before they cause bigger issues and be gracious when someone gets called up to "the majors" from your core raid group - it's a nod to the success of both that raider and your guild.

Stephanius
05-29-2009, 05:59 AM
My guild celebrated it's 10th Anniversary last year. We moved from Ultima Online to WoW together. Naturally there is some fluctuation in members, but besides having a solid core we have many former members return after absences of 6-24 months.

Hit Me
06-02-2009, 12:29 PM
I can tell you from experience that a semi-casual guild that raids consistently is one of the hardest things to run in the game. You get people who take it too casually and then you get people who take it too seriously and rarely get the people right in the middle that are perfectly happy where they are. The more casual people usually end up quitting the game or at least stop raiding and the more serious people usually end up moving up to a higher end guild that can offer more for them leaving you typically recruiting constantly. The roughest times are the 'break' times as well. Where people get out of school and go on vacation/RL stuff and you get even fewer people on and have a chance to not raid for a few days or even a week or two. That's the point most of the serious people move up to a higher end guild that's more reliable to them in creating a raid.

Drama always is what kills guilds, I've seen 1 person break up a guild and I've seen 5-6 people break up a guild, no matter what it happens because there will always be people in game who don't get along and you can't do anything about. The best thing to do is just take it one step at a time and realize that's what happens in this game.
I'm having this problem right now. We have people who want to raid a couple times a week and other people who just want to raid whenever they happen to be online. It takes a week of in game mails to get enough people confirmed to raid just one night a week. Even then, people don't show up and we have to pug a few. We've had plenty of people move to more serious guilds and others just disappear altogether. It's a lot of work and frustrating sometimes, but we have a good core who have a blast playing together so it makes it worthwhile.