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View Full Version : Someone explain American Football to me please.



Consecrate
03-06-2009, 05:38 AM
So I keep seeing people talking about quarterbacks and stuff.

I went to America once for 3 months and tried really really hard to understand it but all I could gather is that you're supposed to get really really drunk, like, amazingly drunk and then shout random crap.

I think there may be something to do with 3 seperate teams for each team, but er, other than that all I can remember is the drinking.

Satrina
03-06-2009, 06:09 AM
http://i40.tinypic.com/2enoit2.jpg

Bookie
03-06-2009, 06:11 AM
Booya:
American football - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Football)

Yeah, you're thinking about Offense, Defense, and Special Teams. American Football is confusing at first, but nowhere near so much as Cricket. Think of it as a form of Rugby rather than Football. Personally, I'm a huge football (soccer) fan, but I like American Football as well.

In terms of being a fan, it isn't so different from soccer; you get drunk and yell, but generally soccer-yelling is more organized (chants and anthems and what not). When watching American Football, you just need a few key phrases (block him, he's open, get him, and GO!!!) and you're pretty much covered once you can distinguish between offense / defense and run / pass.

Oh, and you're going to need beer, bbq, and potentially hard-liquor (saints fans I'm looking at you).


Edit: Satrina summed it up better. But minus points for Beckham in an LA jersey.

Aragante
03-06-2009, 06:14 AM
Bookie you almost nailed the whole thing; however, I must point out that based on this past season the Lions fans need the hard stuff more than the 'Aints fans.

Aragante
03-06-2009, 06:17 AM
Also Beckham pictured period is huge fail, let alone in an LA jersey. There are so many footballers out there with better skills and less ego

Ciderhelm
03-06-2009, 06:24 AM
At one point the American South heavily idealized medieval culture. This was influenced by a series of writers including Sir Walter Scott. Jousting and fencing were once very popular. Football originated from this same culture (though started in Connecticut). The game is similar to Rugby except that it's built as a castle siege game. Movements are purposely slow and tactical with strict back and forth rules to simulate a defending and offending army.

Once you understand the rules you'll see it's a much, much more complex game than either international football or rugby. The flip side is it doesn't reward individual physical and mental prowess to the degree of either. :)

Durandro
03-06-2009, 06:27 AM
I've started to take a minor interest in American Football, despite being English, and am considering playing it. But I still don't really understand it.

All I can gather is all the linemen are huge brickhouses of men who crush everything in their path, and the quarterback is the glory hog who throws the ball and gets all the praise. Before the opposing linemen rush him and snap his legs.

Aragante
03-06-2009, 06:27 AM
And Cider had to go and put an intellectual spin on a wonderfully beautiful and yet brutal game

Satrina
03-06-2009, 06:36 AM
You can dispute the finer points of Beckham with or without an LA jersey all you want. I just used the first picture I came to. The real crux of the matter is that when it comes right down to it, neither of those sports are hockey, and are thus irrelevant.

Bookie
03-06-2009, 06:42 AM
Whooo, easy there, Cider! I would agree that the rules of American Football are more complex than IFB, but I don't think the game is. It's personal opinion, but I think that, with most things, there's a deceptive level of depth to IFB once you really get to the nitty gritty. Similarly, I wouldn't make the second point about physical and mental prowess to Troy Polamalu's face! :p

Actually, from my perspective, IFB is more like a game of chess than American Football, mostly due to the fact that each "piece" of your team is responsible for both attack and defense, and an advantageous attacking position may be poor defensively. But I digress, I love 'em both.

American Footballers are basically of two types: Linemen and "Skill" Positions (it insinuates that being a lineman does not require skill, but it does... it's a terrible classification, but whatever). Linemen are your big guys. Quarterbacks, Running Backs, and Receivers are your "skill" players. And then there's the kicker.

Durando, linemen need more mass than "skill" players, receivers need speed and height, running backs need speed and power, quarterbacks need a strong arm and good decision-making skills. American Football as a game is highly selective for certain body types at certain positions (although there are always exceptions). In other words, if you want to give it a try, you should figure out which role you would be best in based off of your body type.

And finally, what is this hoockeey? Can you eat it? Is it a food? Does it smell good? What an odd word, hoockeeey.

Aragante
03-06-2009, 06:47 AM
While I love hockey(I am in the unfortunate position of being an Islanders fan, yes i know we suck) Football is my first love(american). Steelers football in particular I have been a fan for over 30 years. And no bookie you can't eat it in fact the only time you see a puck outside of hockey is in a mens bathroom and I wouldn't suggest taking a bite

Edgar
03-06-2009, 07:16 AM
Football is not really brutal. All those rules to protect the quarterback made the game a little softer.

I'll try to explain it somewhat simple.

In Football there are 11 players of each side on the field.
Theres an offense and a defense.

Offense

The offense's object is to take the ball into the end-zone, to do that they have 4 tries for 10 yards. Every 10 yards you get 4 new tries.
You can give the ball to a player and he can run with it or you the quarterback can throw the ball for a player to catch.

Offensive positions are:

Quarterback (QB) - The offense's leader, he calls the plays and he takes the ball after the snap and either keeps it to throw it or hands it off to another player. He himself can also run the ball (mostly done if just a few yards or inches are missing to either a 1st goal or a touchdown)

Runningback (RB) - Like the name suggests, this is the guy the QB usually hands the ball to in a running play.

Fullback (FB) - Sort of rare nowadays but as I understand it he's some sort of Tight End except for running plays, e.g. he can be handed the ball but he also does some blocking.

Center (C) - Before the play begins, the Center has the ball in his hand, as soon as he takes the ball and gives it to the QB the play has started. After that he acts pretty much as a normal blocker.

Offensive Guards (OG) - They are located to the left and the right of the C and are there to make sure that anything that wants to get to the quarterback doesn't get there. So they block.

Offensive Tackle (OT) - They are to the left and the right of the OGs. They block to, they block a little different but that is more complicated stuff and I'm too lazy to look it up right now.

Tight End (TE) - A tight end is somewhat a mix of blocker and pass reciever, what ever the play needs them to do.

Wide Receiver (WR) - They run towards the end-zone and try to break free of the players that cover them so the QB can throw the ball to them.

If think that is all.


Defense!

The defense's object is to make sure that the offense does not succeed.
They can blitz the QB, which means that the most part of the Defense is trying to get to the QB as fast as possible, putting pressure on him and the ultimate goal is sacking him (tackling and bringing him down before he can throw the ball). Blitzing of course can be dangerous, if the offensive blocking is excellent and the QB is sharp and fast, pass coverage is weakened and vulnerable.
Then there's man coverage where you just pretty much put a guy on every offensive player and try to make sure that the pass is not caught, the run is not going far etc.

Phew, let's see if I can come up with all positions

Linebacker (LB) - My favorite position. The Linebacker is usually located behind the defensive linemen. They are part of the blitz, are there to stop running plays, also cover short-to-medium range passes.

Safety (SS or FS) - They usually help the Cornerbacks to cover the pass, intercept the ball etc. they are more in the back of the field. They also sometimes help blitzing and sacking the QB.

Conerback (CB) - They cover the WR and make sure that either the pass is not caught or that they catch the ball themselves.

Defensive Tacke (DT) - Also there to stop the running player but are toe-to-toe with the offensive linemen so they have to get past those.

Defensive End (DE) - They're at the edges and do pretty much the same as the DT as far as my understanding goes.

Phew, that should be all.

There's special teams but I'm tired of explaining this stuff. I'll try to make it very short.

If you fail to gain 10 yards in 3 tries the ball is usually punted, the punter stands a few yards back, the center throws the ball at the snap, a player holds the ball down and the punter kicks the shit out of it. At the other side of the field there'll be a punt returner that tries to return the ball as far as possible, the position where is brought down is also the position where the regular defense and offense will start their plays.

Kick-off happens at the beginning of the first, the 3rd quarter and everytime a team scores in any ways.

Hmm what else. Flags, when a referee or official throws a yellow flag there has been a foul (soccer term I think) and there is some penalty to be called, usually it's a yard-penalty (e.g. the offense needs to go extra yards or less yards depending on who gets penalized)



This is getting out of hand and it is a wall of text already. There's so much more to tell but meh, just ask ffs.

tillara
03-06-2009, 11:23 AM
meh, its basically rugby league (not union ) with more body armour!

and cricket is well easy- bloke throws ball at a bunch of sticks, block standing in front of sticks stops sticks being hit by batting the ball away, then he runs up and down between sticks until the opposition get the ball back and are able to use it to knock sticks over. if sticks go down he is out and gets replaced......rinse and repeat

Tatt
03-06-2009, 11:28 AM
I am falling out of my chair at the moment, reading how wonderfully my career in college football is being summed up....Cider thinks I'm dumb (:p) someone else thinks my former position (DE) requires more mass than skill (false) and many other wonderful stereotypes and trivialities.....Edge still wins, I love the line "They block like guards but sort of different and I am too lazy to look it up..."

kolben
03-06-2009, 11:30 AM
Don't let the pads fool you, you can take one hell of a shot through all that stuff. I don't know that much about rugby, I imagine there are a lot of injuries. Here in the states there have been numerous revisions to helmets and shoulderpads over the years to prevent serious and sometimes fatal injuries. Runners (tail backs, running backs, full backs etc.) in particular are at risk of head and neck injuries by the nature of how they penetrate lines. My neck and left shoulder still have shooting pain some days from injuries I received in high school, I'm in my 30s.

When I visited Australia some people I met called it Grid Iron. That seems a more fitting name to me, but yes we call it football for some reason.

Tatt
03-06-2009, 11:34 AM
My left forearm, bicep, and pectoral are slightly smaller (and always will be) due to severe wrist injuries I sustained in football, I cannot grip anything as well with my left so the muscles have never been able to develop as fully.

Kavtor
03-06-2009, 11:43 AM
I would agree that the rules of American Football are more complex than IFB, but I don't think the game is. It's personal opinion, but I think that, with most things, there's a deceptive level of depth to IFB once you really get to the nitty gritty.

You can say the same thing for American Football. The teamwork and coordination for each play is really quite something, even at a college ball level. Especially once you consider the high speed move / counter move that takes place to protect your carrier or exploit the other teams defense as the play unfolds.

/insert Canadian hockey bias here

Turkson
03-06-2009, 11:54 AM
You can say the same thing for American Football. The teamwork and coordination for each play is really quite something, even at a college ball level. Especially once you consider the high speed move / counter move that takes place to protect your carrier or exploit the other teams defense as the play unfolds.



I use to play Little League and some High School stuff. My step dad (who happened to have played as an OT for the Air Force Academy Falcons) was very impressed at the skill and the level we were playing at in Little League. He was expecting some Benny Hill type stuff with all of us jumping on one another and the ball lying some 15 yards away. Even as 12-13y/o's, we were setting up running lanes, running passing routes, and able to set up block schemes. Even at the most amateurish level, there is still alot of teamwork and coordination.

IceHaus151
03-06-2009, 11:55 AM
You can dispute the finer points of Beckham with or without an LA jersey all you want. I just used the first picture I came to. The real crux of the matter is that when it comes right down to it, neither of those sports are hockey, and are thus irrelevant.


Hockey? There is still a NHL? What? Since when? I havent seen them on any channel in like 5 years. I thought this SIdney Crosby was an up and comming figure skater! Is this wrong?

Inaara
03-06-2009, 11:56 AM
American Football is Rugby on sedatives.

Aragante
03-06-2009, 11:59 AM
nah you have it backwards Inaara.....Rugby has much more arm tackling

Inaara
03-06-2009, 12:01 PM
What do women and football players have in common?

They both wear pads........ pussies.

Tatt
03-06-2009, 12:02 PM
Inaara is just upset that he got beat up by the last chic he picked a fight with, and she slapped him around with her pad before she walked away :)

Aragante
03-06-2009, 12:02 PM
lol...while a funny joke...rubgy players still take offense to being hit stright up

Aragante
03-06-2009, 12:02 PM
ouch Tatt

Hit Me
03-06-2009, 12:06 PM
Don't let the pads fool you, you can take one hell of a shot through all that stuff. I don't know that much about rugby, I imagine there are a lot of injuries. Here in the states there have been numerous revisions to helmets and shoulderpads over the years to prevent serious and sometimes fatal injuries. Runners (tail backs, running backs, full backs etc.) in particular are at risk of head and neck injuries by the nature of how they penetrate lines. My neck and left shoulder still have shooting pain some days from injuries I received in high school, I'm in my 30s.

When I visited Australia some people I met called it Grid Iron. That seems a more fitting name to me, but yes we call it football for some reason.

Football helmets are the most misleading things ever. You look at them and think that nothing could possibly hurt your nugget with that big shell over it, but nothing could be farther from the truth. Sure, you don't get the sharp pains, cuts and broken noses/teeth because of the helmet, but every impact is brain rattling and headache inducing. Your whole melon just gets jarred all around.

It's the same with headgear in combat sports. Headgear causes there to be more of a thud, but less sharp pain, bruises and cuts. The only time I prefer the headgear is when we'll be using elbows, increasing the chance of cuts.

IceHaus151
03-06-2009, 12:06 PM
lol...while a funny joke...rubgy players still take offense to being hit stright up


And they always seem to be in big ol sweaty man piles.....

kolben
03-06-2009, 12:09 PM
I would have liked to play hockey. I can sort of skate, just wasn't much opportunity to do it where I grew up. Now there are plenty of places for kids to learn to play though, pretty cool.

From my experience what makes American Football a tough sport is that the players focus on power, power hits, power blocks, power drives; what us tanks might call "burst" lol. We had an Inside Linebacker named Maris, people feared him. He'd straight drill your ass lol, I don't think he ever seriously hurt someone but you needed a little break to walk it off after that guy ran you over.

Aragante
03-06-2009, 12:14 PM
When I played one of the coaches said to us "I don't want you to injure anyone but I want you to hit them so hard they don't want to play any more"

Tatt
03-06-2009, 12:15 PM
Snot bubbles!!! Hit the bastards so hard that they lay there blowing snot bubbles and need someone to pick them back up!!!!

Durandro
03-06-2009, 12:20 PM
In other words, if you want to give it a try, you should figure out which role you would be best in based off of your body type.

Linebacker, apperently. I'm big, but not quite in the same size catagory as the centers.

Which suits me, really. Means I get a run up on people before i shoulder barge them out of my way.

Aragante
03-06-2009, 12:20 PM
lol

Aragante
03-06-2009, 12:22 PM
So Durandro, essentially you will be melee DPS

Tatt
03-06-2009, 12:23 PM
Wonderful misconceptions! The linebacker only gets to charge forward if the defensive call asks for that....if the quarterback drops back to pass more likely the linebacker has to backpedal or look for any open receivers, while the offensive guard (who usually has 40-60 pounds on the linebacker) gets a running charge AT HIM!

Aragante
03-06-2009, 12:27 PM
yep...MT"okies all melee dps in watch your back"...10sec later Mt" okies all melee out for Whirlwind"....MT" damnit you nub rogue I said all MELEE DPS out...now you have gone and gotten one- shotted by the boss"

kolben
03-06-2009, 12:30 PM
I played Tail Back in varsity, but in practice and some away games got tapped to play Safety on D and back to TB on O. My senior year I had to wear a knee brace so they just played me at TB since it kind of restricted by ability to turn as fast.

Durandro
03-06-2009, 12:42 PM
Well I don't know specifics about gameplay. All I know is I'm big and strong, but not huge. And I can't throw or catch very well due to my short sightedness, and while I can run quickly I can't keep it up for very long.

Bookie
03-06-2009, 12:43 PM
someone else thinks my former position (DE) requires more mass than skill (false)

I was actually making fun of the idea that people (specifically, sports broadcasters) insist on breaking the positions up as lineman and "skill" positions... hence the constant quotation marks around "skill" and the fact that I said it was a terrible classification. I respect the work done there- football games are won and lost by the line. In other words, I was saying that it was false, while still trying to make it clear that there are limitations on how successful a person can be at any given position due to body type (though there are exceptions). And these days that's even more of an interesting topic, with DE's getting lighter and faster around the NFL... ANYWAY!

I remember back in high school- I learned how athletic our line was the first time we ever did the bull ring drill. I got LIT UP. :D

That sucked.

Durandro
03-06-2009, 12:45 PM
As far as I can tell the linemen are the unsung heroes of the game, while the Quarterback especially is a glory hog who gets all the attention and fans.

And also that the Quarterback is the player most likely to have a career-ending injury due to being mugged by the opposing Linebackers.

Ciderhelm
03-06-2009, 12:46 PM
American Football is Rugby on sedatives.
Ironic given that football has more fatalities even with several inches of armor.

Lore
03-06-2009, 12:47 PM
Ironic given that football has more fatalities even with several inches of armor.

Conjecture, sir. More people play Football.

Also I play all-time QB really well. This is because I don't have to do much running.

Durandro
03-06-2009, 12:51 PM
American Football suffers from the same problems as Boxing in that respect - the padding practically encourages you to hit your opponant harder.

But I have noticed that Rugby players tend to be alot bigger then American Footballers. And usually have more mashed up faces.

Both are good sports though. Just different.

kolben
03-06-2009, 12:52 PM
I think offensive lineman are some of the higher paid players in the NFL actually. They are essential to a running game of any kind aside from dumb luck and the opposing team doing something really stupid.... a very well executed play by the offensive line is essential to getting any yards at all. As a former back, I have an appreciation for it since the plays usually involve a block opening a specific line for you, that you are running at full speed through whether it's there or not. When that line (read hole for the non-back/non-American football fans) isn't there, most of the time you're done and it results in getting creamed for no yards gained. Guys like Walter Payton were famous in large part for their ability to "make" lines that weren't there. You have to be a powerful sumbitch to do that lol.

YouTube - Tribute to Walter Payton

Best athlete there's ever been in my humble opinion.

Megamoose
03-06-2009, 12:54 PM
Unfortunately, more and more injuries are turning up as the players of the game get bigger, stronger, and more brutal.

Don't be afraid to disagree, this is just, y'know, local radio stuff.

IceHaus151
03-06-2009, 12:58 PM
American Football suffers from the same problems as Boxing in that respect - the padding practically encourages you to hit your opponant harder.

But I have noticed that Rugby players tend to be alot bigger then American Footballers. And usually have more mashed up faces.

Both are good sports though. Just different.


Football players are quicker though. And maybe rugby players are bigger than WRs or CBs, but I dunno about linemen, LBs, and DEs. Those are some big corn fed people in there. Below is what I could find in 2 minutes of quickly browsing for info. Im at work so Im not going into depth about it, so take it for what its worth (if its worth anything)

Front Rows (Props and Hooker) are generally shorter with large, powerful legs. Usually, in the area of 5'8, 220lbs.
Second Rows (Locks) tend to be the most well built players in terms of overall size. They have long, muscular legs along with great upper body strength. Usually from about 6'0 to 6'6, and once again, in the area of 220lbs. Most locks are about 6'1-6'2 however.
Flankers are generally shorter, but well built with great lower body strength. In the area of 5'8-5'10 usually, with a weight of 200lbs.
Number 8 (Back Row) is usually the tallest player, standing at LEAST 6'1, most are around 6'4-6'6, and weigh in at about 210lbs, though some may be heavier depending on their build.

Backs are pretty similar,
Centres and Wings are shorter and leaner, at 5'6 to 6'0, weighing in anywhere from 150 to 180lbs. Fullbacks, Scrumhalf and Flyhalf are generally a bit larger (but shorter), at 5'5 to 5'9, weighing in from 160 to 190lbs

IceHaus151
03-06-2009, 12:58 PM
Also, football players sure do make a crap ton more money though!

Aragante
03-06-2009, 01:18 PM
A typical middle linebacker in the NFL is roughly 6'2-6'4 and 250lbs. a nose tackle in the 3-4 defense is 6'1 325-345. Standard OT 6'5' 320lbs.. WR can vary from 5'9 185(steve smith) to 6'7' 240 (Ed McCaffery) lots of variances especially with the emergence of some of these big fast wr like calvin johnson. 6'4 240 runs 4.3....insane
There is a book by Paul Zimmerman that discusses the current sizes of American Football players( he also plyaed rugby back in the 40's and 50's....he is currently recovering from a stroke best wishes for a full recovery)
on the average Nfl players are bigger than rubgy ballers...the reason that rugby players have more messed up faces is because they aren;t smart enough to wear a helmet

Satrina
03-06-2009, 03:55 PM
Ironic given that football has more fatalities even with several inches of armor.

Most assuredly NSFW. NSF the squeamish either (http://tinyurl.com/bpo8hd)

edit: damn youtube autoembed

Tatt
03-06-2009, 04:02 PM
Thank you Icehaus for stating rugby player size, I was confused by the statements about rugby players being considered larger than american football players. For reference I was a Defensive End at 6'2" and approximately 250. I was told my days of playing were over unless I could get considerably faster for the position I was in, or gain in the neighborhood of 50-75 pounds of muscle and move to nose tackle. I was not willing to gain the weight (or capable of IMO) and did not think I could gain the speed without getting considerably smaller, so bye bye dreams of NFL :)

kolben
03-06-2009, 04:21 PM
Ouch!

I had heard stories about Goalies. Lots of skates to delicate body parts etc. Don't most of them wear a plate thinger that hangs down from the chin of their mask to cover the throat area?

Rastus
03-08-2009, 05:41 PM
Getting really, really drunk and shouting random stuff works in all sports.

Edgar
03-08-2009, 05:59 PM
As a bears fan I have to agree with kolben on Walter Payton. Couple months ago I got a free Bears History DVD with my order and Walter Payton was definitely a hardcore athlete in his training methods and on the field.

Rhyseh
03-08-2009, 06:47 PM
In terms of NFL player and Rugby player size I agree that your average NFL player is much larger than your average Rugby player. This is due to the nature of the sport, where American Football is very stop start Rugby is very flowing, as a foreward in Rugby you do not stop running, driving tackling for two 40 minutes blocks. This requires the body to not only be able to deliver power, but be able to deliver it for 80 minutes of play. Thus promoting stamina and effcient muscular development.

In American Football the burst nature of the game promotes strength and size much more. So the demand to maintain that performance for a long, intense period is simply not there, breaks are frequent, hell they even change entire teams during the game. So the focus is on putting more power and more speed into a small space of time rather than being able to maintain it for a long amount of time.

Klimpen
03-09-2009, 02:16 AM
Australian Rules is a nasty piece of work.

My highschool was rather rough, so my anecdotes of Rec [a few hours a week of running around and being idiots] are probably vastly different.

We usually had smaller than usual teams, so League was the game of choice over Union. It racked up a collarbone and arm broken.

Aussie Rules got 2 broken arms and a fractured skull. I got knocked out for a few seconds after a nasty hit.

Even Soccer got a broken foot.