PDA

View Full Version : How to attract and pick out good players



sevve
12-13-2008, 01:26 PM
I'm one of the leaders of a 25-man guild. We raid 25-man three nights a week, and since we have a solid core of good and dedicated players we've been able to do quite ok.

The problem is that we lack people, and we're having huge problems attracting good players. Also the applications we get are really short, so it's hard to weed players before we've actually tried them.

We are using the realm forum, guild recruitment forum and trade channel to reach the people, but this doesn't really seem to be going anywhere.

So my questions are:
Does anyone have a good recruitment strategy for lesser known guilds?
How do you make your application template to be able to separate the good from the bad?

Thanks

Garbid
12-13-2008, 02:05 PM
Encourage your guild-members to go pug heroics.

Not only do you spot good players, but you show yourself out there. Our forums are full of people interested in joining after doing several heroic pugs with our members and were impressed.

Also works as a pre-trial, giving you guys a hint of how the person was ;)

Genova
12-13-2008, 02:44 PM
A good way to weed out people is put wierd instructions in your app, not just the standard format of

Name
Age
Time played.. etc

Try to go out there and word things to where people actually have to read the questions to be able to respond correctly. You know the classic, Last name first, first name last kind of idea.

It helps weed out people who cant listen, or have problems paying attention.

Peaches
12-14-2008, 07:01 AM
Having a living forum does a lot of the work for you. Take the time to set one up and do a proper job with an application template. Include persona type questions. I am a fond believer that if you can beat Megaman(any title) then you can do anything in this game. Gamers have skill, loot comes after that.

A really nice way to bring people to your guild is Vault 25. Simply advertise trade chat for members for a Archavon 25, run the raid confidently, praise players who do well, etc. You will find they like what the see and inquire!

orcstar
12-14-2008, 03:35 PM
I do it the pug way. Works pretty well for us.

Just get some people from looking for group of the appropriate class you're recruiting and see how they perform. Then have a friendly chat with em, make it a nice run and have skilled guildies with you.

In the end if they perform well (or outperform their gear) ask em if they're interested.

sevve
12-15-2008, 08:05 AM
Thanks for input.

Just a question for you Orcstar; how do you get pickups to come along when they have poor chances on loot? I find that most people lose their interest once I say we're using a dkp system, and I feel it wouldn't be fair to leave it out. Tryouts are easy to get, but they're normally poor.

Lavache
12-15-2008, 08:39 AM
Thanks for input.

Just a question for you Orcstar; how do you get pickups to come along when they have poor chances on loot? I find that most people lose their interest once I say we're using a dkp system, and I feel it wouldn't be fair to leave it out. Tryouts are easy to get, but they're normally poor.

we have always awarded dkp across the board to anyone in the raid and allowed them to roll / bid on items that drop, even if they go into the negative (we dont run zero-sum.) they generally wont win over a guild member and high desire items will stay in guild because people will be bidding highly on them. once you have been in a zone for more than a few weeks you will start to see quite a few shards anyways.

if the run is a quick mostly guild pug we just /roll on everything and set basic loot rules up front - 1 item per person type things.

Tocatank
12-15-2008, 08:53 AM
Thanks for input.

Just a question for you Orcstar; how do you get pickups to come along when they have poor chances on loot? I find that most people lose their interest once I say we're using a dkp system, and I feel it wouldn't be fair to leave it out. Tryouts are easy to get, but they're normally poor.

We generally do free rolls on loot pugs will be using for thier main spec, it sucks from a guild persepective but its only fair they should have a equal shot.

Wasshoi
12-19-2008, 04:14 AM
Pies and Punch during raidtime! Keeps the boys well fed and happy~

All jokes aside, i personally doubt you'll see a lot of turnout from forum recruitment unless youre after a certain niche area(offering a different timezone, alternate loot system, flexi hours etc) or have good progression/epeen - in times like these people usually oversell themselves (imo) and tend to go for a guild thats beyond their caliber. So that option wont be that much viable until much much later IMO - ( its a bit harsh, i know).

You might want to consider mergers with other guilds, or acquisitions/takeovers (on top of pugging to sift in potential members). Although proceed with caution, mergers and takeovers can more often turn sour than not.

orcstar
12-19-2008, 07:15 AM
Thanks for input.

Just a question for you Orcstar; how do you get pickups to come along when they have poor chances on loot? I find that most people lose their interest once I say we're using a dkp system, and I feel it wouldn't be fair to leave it out. Tryouts are easy to get, but they're normally poor.
I should have been clearer.
When I said PuG I more meant heroics. PuGging people in raids can be painful, especially if you have to explain tactics over raidchat instead of ventrilo to people who never have been there. Been there done that, got the T-shirt.

I pug and pug and I pug a lot. Raiding is nice, raiding is fun, but always playing with the same people tends to make you narrow minded about how things should be done. That's why I like PuGs.
When a PuG goes well I start talking about raiding. If I see people respond with big stories about how "ubar" they are, and that they cleared Nax in under two hours I know it's not guild material. But if I see someone performing well and playing focused and responds something like: my guild doesn't do raids, I ask him: "haven't you ever thought about raiding".

Then I explain we're a fun guild which is pretty relaxed but when we raid we raid focussed.

There are a lot of player out there who think raiding is some kind of elite e-sport, that only the best of the best of the server can do it. They would never come up with the idea that they can also raid and that raiding isn't that hard or elite as some people make it out to be, but is just a bunch of people having fun. Ironacilly there's a lot of good ansd skilled players who think that way. Often the ones who always question their own skills and perforamce. These are the people who don't sit back but always want to improve but don't think they're good enough for raiding.

Sometimes someone needs n eyeopener and that can give you really good players as a guild.

kolben
12-19-2008, 07:59 AM
Pickup groups are a great way to meet new recruits, as well as friends you can ask to fill spots. This is why I would recommend being on your best behavior and bringing your A game to PUGs. Consider it as much a job interview for them as for yourself, you are trying to convince them to make a commitment to your group after all.

People who treat pickup groups like crap usually get crappy pickup groups.

I'm trying to not paint everyone with the same brush who displays a certain characteristic. I have noticed that people who don't put any effort into filling out an app, are also people who will probably not use your forums, or make any contribution outside bare minimums. That's not going to be the case for everyone, but it speaks volumes to me just based on experience with people who did exactly that.

I've done the grab-all-warm-bodies-so-we-can-raid approach. It works, but you'll soon find yourself cursing the 10-15 people that are being carried every raid by the 10 or so dedicated folks you have who pull it together and make it happen if your expectations included competitive progression or anything resembling it. So I'd caution you to be crystal clear about your expectations from the members. If that means you expect them to perform and work on their gear, etc. to get invites do that now not later. If you just want to raid and your group can handle some set backs including re-learning farm bosses on occasion then it's not as big of a deal.

Good luck!

Moloch
12-23-2008, 07:52 AM
Another good thing to do with recruitment via forums is to make your guild stand out and show why it is different from other raiding guilds around. When I was a recruiter I would include like a short FAQ-style section in the post of things that made the guild unique. Certainly include the basics like raid times and what not. But like, if you have a very indepth system in place for the guild bank to help out the members; mention it. Do you have an exceptionally inspirational and calm raid leader? Mention it. Minor details like that are what query interested minds to look for more. Personally I always pass up guilds that just include the status quo information because I know that's what they'll be, the status quo.

When you're looking for potential members, do an interview. Ask them what things interest them, what they like to do IRL etc. After you get a feel for their personality, delve into mechanics questions and questions about their class. I -always- refrain from asking at all about gear. If they start in about gear it's usually an instant turn off to me. I already know their gear level because I've checked it on the armory.

Another question I like to ask is "What do you want out of a raid guild?". If their answer is loot or progression, I'm usually not interested. Because once those things end or you hit a serious road-block, they are usually the first people to bail or stop logging on.

Also, your current guild members are one of your greatest assets. Take their word for things. If someone says I grouped with this person and think they'd be a good addition, well you are in a win-win. Because that member cares about making the guild better and is actively working for you as well.

kolben
12-23-2008, 08:13 AM
When you're looking for potential members, do an interview. Ask them what things interest them, what they like to do IRL etc. After you get a feel for their personality, delve into mechanics questions and questions about their class. I -always- refrain from asking at all about gear. If they start in about gear it's usually an instant turn off to me. I already know their gear level because I've checked it on the armory.


This.

An example from this is a new warlock we had in our guild, a fresh level 70. She came to our SSC/TK runs with dungeon blues and spanked the experienced DPS who were wearing T5/2.3 Patch badge gear including other warlocks. She wanted to raid, and had done her homework on how to play and it showed.

Kedearian
12-23-2008, 10:39 PM
Really the best way i've seen to weed out applicants is to take them personally through a heroic run, pick something their class is bad at, something that will test them. If they screw up or dont know the fights, tell them that they need to progress, give them pointers, then show them the door.

Ked