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View Full Version : A good guide to guild officers and their roles?



Lilie
09-11-2007, 08:39 AM
Hey you guys...so glad to see this new section on the site, Cider! In my 48 lvls of playing WoW as a warrior I have made some great friends and we have decided to start a guild together (born yesterday..."Haven" on the Auchindoun server). Anyways, I am writing because I am trying to look at guild models for officer names and roles. Obviously we are just now trying to figure all of this out. I have tried working through the WoW forums on the subject and guildroundtable.com's latency issues are frustrating me to no end, so I thought I'd pitch the issue to you all for suggestions. Thanks for being such a resource here!

Paruhdox
09-12-2007, 06:28 AM
i will right something up about this really quick when i get a chance today. It can be a little complicated at times depending on how your guild is set up. There are different styles to leadership in guilds so ill go over some.

Soulonn
09-12-2007, 12:29 PM
Just a quick response here, based on my experience with guilds in both WoW and Everquest.

GuildMaster: sometimes a figurehead in the eyes of the guild’s soldiers, but is responsible for managing the class leaders, conflict resolution, and PR. Has the final say in every matter, just about.

Class Leads: One officer for each class that then administrates that class. They have input on what the recruiting needs are for their class. They maintain a listing of the specs and possibly even the gear needed by their people. Very frequently are raid leaders, tasked with arranging their people where they need to be for every encounter.

Loot Council: whether you’re using a dkp, rolling, or loot council system, these guys administer it… they’re in charge of all things loot-ish. Most guilds use the core officers (class leads, gm) for this role as well.

Recruiting Officer: takes input from the class leads and GM and interfaces with the public in order to fill the guild’s needs. Is the point of contact for all recruits, and is tasked with making sure the recruits that are online are aware of any raids. Maintains a list of the recruits, and whether the recruits meet all requirements for invite to the guild.

(Optional) Treasurer: administers the guild bank, issuing needed components to the guild tradeskillers for consumables needed for raids.

(Optional) Raid Leader(s): Some guilds have dedicated raid leaders. I’ve never found this to be necessary. If you have good people, the officers (class leads, etc) step and get the raids done. However a position like this allows one of the “soldiers” to step up and contribute to the guild in a more meaningful way.

I wish you luck in your endeavor. If you want to pick my brain further, just ask. I have extensive experience with guild leadership, coming almost exclusively from a casual/casual raiding background.

Paruhdox
09-13-2007, 06:43 AM
Ok lets keep it simple it all really depends on what kind of system you want your guild to run on. Idealy for high end raiding you will find Councils and Dictatorships. In most non-highend guilds you just have a simple dictator and his officers are usually yes men.

Guild Master

In any case from a raid stand point which is pretty much all I know, the guild masters is going to probably be more of a spiritual leader/problem solver. The officers should be people who help him split his work load, the whole purpose of this is so you dont get overwhelmed doing it all. The guild master may lead raids as well but that all depends on how good / comfortable he is with it. Keep in mind outside of raiding the guild master has to handle all the political crap as well.

Officers

Officers fill many rolls, from recruiting, splitting the workload of the raid leader, and being class leaders. Alot of times more often than not this title is not labeled as an officer but as class leader, raid leader, recruiter, and so on. Basically anyone who can see O chat reguardless of there title

Raid Leaders

Officers may double in some aspect and lead raids as well but more often than not in most guilds ive ever been in we have had dedicated people focused towards leading the raids. The reason we devoted one person to it is because you have to have a vast understanding of the game to break down an encounter and know how it applies to every class.

Class Leads

Class Leaders are a very good thing when you are trying to make a raid group. These will be your advisors on new members, applicants, prospects. You really want someone with a vast knowledge of their class in these posistions because generally you want there advice on whether or not someone knows how to play there class.

Loot Council

A loot council is something you need to be careful with as some people may find it unfair. This is something you use to distribute loot to your raid for maximum progression. This means you give an item more often than not to who ever is the most active and it will help the most. Generally this is decided by officer/class leaders. Some times the problem is your officers and your key players are the most consistant and it might seem like they are getting more gear from this system and if thats the case alot of times guild members feel cheated so you really need to be careful doing something like this.

Soulonn
09-13-2007, 06:55 AM
I guess this is as good a place for discussion as any... I think we have two very different perspectives, as it seems like your guild is very high end and I've never been a part of one... but in your experience, do you feel like it's better to have a raid "team" instead of a raid "leader"? In my experience having the responsibility decentralized means that if that one raid leader isn't on, there's someone else that can step up and lead. This may not be as applicable in a high end raiding guild with rigid attendance requirements, as the raid leaeder will most likely show up for nearly every raid. In a casual/casual raiding guild, the more people that know the encounters, the better your chances are of having someone at the raid that not only knows what to do, but commands the respect of the troops (someone they're used to taking orders from).

Ceravantes
09-13-2007, 10:48 AM
I have not been in a high end guild in wow, but was for years in eq, I now lead raids/help run a semi casual guild and in my experience with both types of guilds is that it is incredibly difficult to handle all aspects of leading a raid yourself, therefore designating other officers or members ti help with leading raids is beneficial two ways, it helps alleviate some of the sdtresses and make the raid move more smoothly, and it always helps in getting a replacement ready for any absences of the main raid leader.

The most important thing about leading a raid is that instruction should come from only one source All other raid leaders should be doing there work behind the scenes, say setting healer assignments in a healer chat channel, helping instruction in officer or a set chat channel, I personally use phantoms in vent with second keybind's to speak with other officers about healing assignments and to let me know if I have missed anything or if they think I should add anything to my strat's etc.

To be perfectly honest, a rundown of roes in leadership of a guild is nice, but you need to try things out for yourself,as cookie cutter setups just wont work for everyone. Both of the above posts are nice, but remember to use them as guidelines, perhaps take some things from each with some of your own ideas and make them your own, that is, in my opinion, the whole reasion to create and run your own guild.

Penlowe
09-17-2007, 11:38 AM
The basics are already here, and well stated : ) I offer a little deeper look at the qualities of the individuals you want for officers.

To save typing time I offer this:
http://www.smarciz.com/smarciz/RoundTable/e107_plugins/forum/forum_viewtopic.php?22

Have you got a mission statement yet? Rules? Consequences? Lots to do in setting up a guild : )

Yorg
09-18-2007, 03:34 AM
While i fully agree with Penlowe's things to look for in an officer, i'd like to add a few comment.
Background: i'v been in the same guild for 2 years and through several deep change. Half of this time i was officer/class leader. Basically we are a semi-casual guild, with 3 raids per week and around 50 main.
There is in my opinion a coupleof people you really want to have, maybe not as officer but definitely as members.

- First one, someone who'll never accept the way your guild work. While this can be pretty tiring when you're officer, when this person is mature and offer constructive criticism, it's invaluable. As officer/GM, you will often stick with what's working. Even if it could be done better, you won't have enough time to work on every detail. Having someone point to you what feels wrong is very useful in any social group. For obvious reasons, this "rebel" will almost never be an officer. Good luck balancing the need of him and the urge to kick him out though :D

- Second one, the buffon. Once again, someone being able to laugh and make people laugh in almost any situation is very valuable. For moral (and we already know it's an important factor in every raid) and for the sheer pleasure of it (hopefully, ours is pretty lame but that's part of the fun).

- Last but not least, the bad guy. This one always need to be an officer and he's the one you want to let roam free when someone is seriously crossing lines. I was the bad guy and was used to kick out members, to yell at raids and so on. No need to be rude nor mean there, but the "good cop/bad cop" works well in the oficers team. Never abuse it, it's way more efficient when used scarcely.

It will almost never be easy to attribute those role, but keep an eye open to recognise them in your members. Having them aboard makes wonder to work with and lead the social group of psycho, nerds, geeks and the occasionnal sane people that is a wow guild.

PS : sorry for the somewhat mangled english, not my native tongue.

juggernauth
09-18-2007, 06:30 AM
Nice post Yorg :)

I think I'm something like a combo of those three people, with some bonus :p

Paruhdox
09-18-2007, 06:35 AM
I guess this is as good a place for discussion as any... I think we have two very different perspectives, as it seems like your guild is very high end and I've never been a part of one... but in your experience, do you feel like it's better to have a raid "team" instead of a raid "leader"? In my experience having the responsibility decentralized means that if that one raid leader isn't on, there's someone else that can step up and lead. This may not be as applicable in a high end raiding guild with rigid attendance requirements, as the raid leaeder will most likely show up for nearly every raid. In a casual/casual raiding guild, the more people that know the encounters, the better your chances are of having someone at the raid that not only knows what to do, but commands the respect of the troops (someone they're used to taking orders from).

You can have more than one Raid Leader but never a team leading one raid. You should have 2-3 raid leaders even in high end guilds people have jobs, school, and families. So yes there should be multiple but you need to make clear who is the active raid leader at the raid and they the other raid leaders understand he is in charge. If you dont there will probably be some dissension in the ranks and you dont want that.